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Heart attacks can either start slowly or occur intensely and suddenly. A heart attack may cause pressure, fullness, pain, or squeezing in the chest that comes and goes. You may feel like you’re experiencing bad indigestion and pain that spreads to your neck, jaws, teeth, shoulders, arms, abdomen, or back. A heart attack ...
Heart Disease
 
Often called “a silent threat,” heart disease often displays no symptoms until a heart attack or stroke occurs. Seek immediate emergency medical attention for cardiovascular symptoms like shortness of breath, chest pain, confusion, pain or numbness in your legs and arms, blurred vision, and loss of consciousness.
 
Heart Attack
 
Call emergency medical services immediately if you or someone else experience signs of a heart attack, which is a life-or-death medical emergency. A heart attack is potentially fatal and requires emergency medical treatment to sustain life. The longer a person waits for treatment, the higher likelihood they have of experiencing permanent heart damage or death.
 
Heart attacks can either start slowly or occur intensely and suddenly. A heart attack may cause pressure, fullness, pain, or squeezing in the chest that comes and goes. You may feel like you’re experiencing bad indigestion and pain that spreads to your neck, jaws, teeth, shoulders, arms, abdomen, or back. A heart attack can also cause nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, and a cold sweat. 
 
Chest discomfort is the most common symptom of heart attack. However, women have a higher likelihood of experiencing overwhelming fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, shortness of breath, and back or jaw pain.
 
Stroke
 
Call for emergency medical services immediately if you or someone else is having a stroke. Immediate treatment is paramount, ideally within the first three hours of the onset of symptoms. Do not dismiss your condition even if symptoms desist and make sure to seek emergency medical treatment, which will reduce your risk of disability and potentially save your life.
 
Symptoms of stroke can begin suddenly and may be more severe at the onset of a stroke. Symptoms may gradually worsen or fluctuate during the first few days. Call for medical attention even if your symptoms go away. A stroke is only considered complete when your symptoms stop worsening. 
 
Symptoms include severe headache, the feeling of weakness or paralysis in your leg, arm, or face, numbness, tingling, difficulty walking, loss of coordination and balance, dizziness, fatigue, and loss of consciousness.
 
You may experience blurred vision, loss of vision, double vision, uncontrollable eye movements, drooping eyelids, drooling, and difficulty swallowing.
 
You may have difficulty thinking, remembering, talking, and understanding what others are saying. You may feel confused. A stroke can also trigger behavioral or personality changes like feeling agitated, depressed, or apathetic.