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Your heart manages dual pumping systems with one on the left side and one on the right side. The left side’s system comprises the left ventricle and left atrium. When you breathe in, your lungs infuse your blood with new oxygen. Your left atrium receives this newly oxygenated blood and moves it to the left ventricle, which sends it out
Introduction 
 
Mitral valve prolapse (MVP), also known as Barlow’s syndrome or floppy mitral valve, occurs when the valve between the lower and upper chambers of the heart does not open and close properly. MVP is caused by backflow of blood and can be heard as a heart murmur. It may or may not exhibit symptoms. 
 
Anatomy
 
A thick wall, called the septum, divides your heart into four sections called chambers. The upper two chambers, called atria, receive incoming blood to the heart, while the bottom chambers, called ventricles, send blood outward from the heart.
 
Your heart manages dual pumping systems with one on the left side and one on the right side. The left side’s system comprises the left ventricle and left atrium. When you breathe in, your lungs infuse your blood with new oxygen. Your left atrium receives this newly oxygenated blood and moves it to the left ventricle, which sends it out from your heart to circulate all through the rest of your body. The mitral valve, which has two flaps, keeps the blood from flowing backward. 
 
Causes
 
Mitral valve prolapse happens when the mitral valve fails to open and close properly. The valve’s flaps may allow backflow of blood due to a collapse into the atrium. MVP can be an inherited condition or occur when someone is born with certain chest wall deformities or a hole in the septum. MVP is associated with Marfan’s syndrome and Grave’s disease.
 
Diagnosis
 
Your doctor will check for a heart murmur by using a stethoscope to listen to your heart. Several tests, such a chest X-ray, computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging scan, echocardiogram, Doppler ultrasound, or electrocardiogram, can be used to diagnose MVP. Additionally, cardiac catheterization can view how the heart is working by inserting a long, thin tube into a blood vessel.
 
Treatment
 
Usually, MVP does not require treatment. In severe cases, the valves may be corrected or replaced through surgery. Medications may also help treat MVP symptoms or a leaky valve. Your doctor will prescribe antibiotics prior to dental work of surgery to prevent infection.
 
Prevention
 
Mitral valve prolapse, in most cases, cannot be prevented. Inform your dentist and other health care providers that you have MVP. Your doctor will prescribe antibiotics prior to dental work of surgery to prevent infection.
 
Am I At Risk
 
Family history of the condition may indicate that you are at risk for mitral valve prolapse. People born with a hole in the septum, chest wall deformities, Grave’s Disease, or Marfan’s syndrome have a higher likelihood of developing MVP.
 
Complications
 
Sometimes, the irregular, erratic heartbeat that is associated with MVP can be fatal. Your doctor will determine and explain the severity of your condition.